Chemical Probes with Anti-Inflammatory, Neuroprotective and Anti-Cancer Properties

Technology #d-1428

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Researchers
Nadezhda German
Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, Texas
External Link (www.ttuhsc.edu)
Constantinos Mikelis
Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, Texas
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Cameron Smith
Licensing Associate 806-834-6822
Patent Protection

Provisional Patent Application Filed

Many diseases and disorders of the brain cause swelling of brain tissue also known as neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammation is beginning to be recognized as one of the hallmark signs and disease progression factors of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The swelling of brain tissue can limit the amount of blood flow to areas in the brain and can inhibit the body’s natural disease fighting mechanisms. Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) also cause significant neuroinflammation. Unresolved and severe brain edema is the leading cause of death for TBI patients within the first few days of the injury.  

This technology presents a drug that is able to combat neuroinflammation caused by these diseases and disorders. This technology acts by blocking two receptors in the brain that contribute to the increase in inflammation and leads to a greater decrease in brain edema. This technology’s high specificity and potency will also lead to a substantially reduced central nervous system toxicity rate.  

Reference Number: D-1428 

Market Applications: 

  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Neurological disorder treatment  

Features, Benefits, & Advantages: 

  • Reduced risk of nervous system toxicity
  • One drug can block two receptors
  • More selective binding than current receptor antagonists 

Intellectual Property:

  • A US provisional patent, serial number 62543336, was filed on 8/9/17.

Development Stage: The technology has been developed and is being tested in vivo. 

Researchers:

  • Nadezhda German, Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, Texas
  • Constantinos Mikelis, Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, Texas

Keywords: Neuroinflammation, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, TBI