Biomarkers in Porcine Urine for Detecting Fever and Illness

Technology #d-1416

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Researchers
John McGlone
Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
External Link (www.depts.ttu.edu)
Anoosh Rakhshandeh
Sankarganesh Devaraj
Managed By
Cameron Smith
Licensing Associate 806-834-6822
Patent Protection

Provisional Patent Application Filed

Infections among farm animals pose a huge threat to the food industry. These infections may cause a shortage of available food as well as endanger those who work with the animals.  Early detection of an infection is key in stopping an infection before it becomes prevalent in animal populations. 

While observational methods to detecting animal illness can be effective, there are many variables that lead to failure, including misinterpretation, human error, computer error, and the high cost of diagnostic tests. 

This technology is quick, inexpensive, and acculturate. The air could be sampled at specific time intervals or continuously monitored, and will alert people of sick pigs without needing to touch them, reducing potential human infection. This technology has a multitude of potential uses in the farming and livestock business, veterinary clinics, and possibly doctor’s offices and hospitals.  

Reference Number: D-1416 

Market Applications: 

  • Infection detection
  • Livestock production  

Features, Benefits, & Advantages: 

  • Reduces human error in detecting illness
  • Allows for automated continuous livestock monitoring
  • Fast
  • Inexpensive 

Intellectual Property: 

  • A US provisional patent, serial number 62551019, was filed on 8/28/17. 

Development Stage: The technology has been developed and tested. 

Researchers:

  • Sankarganesh Devaraj, Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
  • Anoosh Rakhshandeh, Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
  • John McGlone, Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 

Keywords: swine, pig, volatile biomarkers