A Model for Noninvasive Diagnosis of Eye Tumor and Estimation of Core Body Temperature by Ocular Surface Temperature

Technology #d-1297

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Researchers
Senay N. Tewolde
Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Naval Medical Research Unit, San Antonio, Texas
Min Chyu
Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Kevin Long
Mathematics and Statistics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Managed By
Cameron Smith
Licensing Associate 806-834-6822
Patent Protection

Provisional Patent Application Filed

Core body temperature is indicative of the human physiological condition and can indicate whether there is an internal issue with a person. Monitoring core body temperature usually requires invasive measurement at different sites, such as inserting catheters equipped with thermometers into the pulmonary artery, esophagus, and rectum. Non-invasive methods, like infrared thermography, can be used as well, though they are known to be inaccurate. Similarly, the current methods for early detection of ocular melanoma and its related tumors within the eye are inaccurate or invasive. Current methods to detect highly malignant ocular melanoma tumors are highly dependent on the clinical experience of the specialist and modern diagnostic techniques.  

This technology provides an accurate method for detecting early-stage, asymptomatic intraocular tumors that can possibly save patients' eyes by using infrared thermography to detect intraocular tumors. Further, it estimates core body temperature, without requiring physical contact.  

Reference Number: D-1297 

Market Applications:

  • Clinical Medicine
  • Veterinary Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
  • Occupational Medicine
  • Forensic Science 

Features, Benefits, & Advantages:

  • Cost effectiveRadiation free
  • Easy to implement without major equipment
  • No physical contact with the patient is necessary 

Intellectual Property: A US provisional patent, serial number 62430964, was filed on 12/7/16. 

Development Stage: A prototype system of this technology has been tested and verified in a relevant environment.   

Researchers:

  • Senay N. Tewolde, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Naval Medical Research Unit, San Antonio, Texas
  • Min Chyu, Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
  • Kevin Long, Mathematics and Statistics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 

Keywords: noninvasive thermal reader, eye tumor detection, noncontact temperature measurement